REPORTING CHILD PORN Visitors since Aug. 06: Hit Counter You may save the life of an infant, a child, a teen, or an adult female forced into prostitution and pornography! There is no such thing as a willing porn victim!  See #2 below. Important: DO NOT VISIT THE PORN SITE.  SEND THE URL BY EMAIL OR MAIL.  If you have an urgent tip such as an email invitation to a child rape or if the email is returned by the server then use the phone number.  If you can't get through on the phone numbers listed call your local police business line and ask for the phone number of the federal police or agency in charge of child abuse.  (Updated Nov. 11, 2006)

AMERICA - U.S.A. - REPORT IT TO THE FBI: Tampa@FBI.gov or www.missingkids.com (1-800-843-5678)

AUSTRALIA WEST:  click here  

AUSTRALIA SOUTH: click here Australian Federal Police (AFP) HQ Ph: (02) 6223 3000 * For local AFP offices click

CANADA: www.cybertip.ca or (1-800-387-7962)

EUROPE: go to www.interpol.int or send the URL (web address of porn site) to children@interpol.net or FAX (33) 472 4471 63 
GREAT BRITAIN: go to www.met.police.uk/childporn/ or call 0808-100-0040  toll-free

IRELAND: ISPA of Ireland Child Pornography Reporting www.hotline.ie or call 1890 610 710
SCOTLAND: go to www.met.police.uk/childporn/ or call 0808-100-0040  toll-free

U.S.A. - REPORT IT TO THE FBI: Tampa@FBI.gov or www.missingkids.com (1-800-843-5678)

For all other countries go to: http://www.interpol.int/Public/Links/PolJust.asp OR http://www.vachss.com/help_text/report_child_porn_intl.html

If  you are unable to make contact through the info above or if you don't understand the instructions email Adrienne@kidsread.net

1. Child Porn: If you have received an email invitation to a child porn web site email the address (URL) to the Innocent Images Task Force (IITF) at  Tampa@FBI.gov.  Do not visit the porn web site.  Sometimes the IITF computers are down for maintenance and your email will be returned as undeliverable.  When this happens go to www.missingkids.com  and fill in the report form.  It is okay to skip the parts you don't understand.  They mostly need the URL, the email, and the city you live in.  Do CNTL +C to copy the email and CNTL +V to paste it into the report.  You can also call MissingKids toll-free at 1-800-843-5678.

2. Adult Porn: If you have received an invitation to an adult porn website visit ObscenityCrimes.org and report the address on their report form. Do not visit the porn web site.  You can save the report form as a Favorite site to save time when reporting future invites.  It is important to report these websites since they violate federal and state laws.  If it is from a foreign country it violates U.S. air waves.  Some terrorists utilize porn websites to earn money for Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations.  Many adult sites also include child porn and underage porn, and all involve unwilling porn subjects.  Porn models are forced into this crime either at gunpoint, through drugs, or because of economic necessity.  Those who consent to it can't wait until its over, are glad to retire, and regret it for the rest of their lives, and  many of them cannot bear a man's touch for the rest of their lives.

3. Adult or child sex site: These can be reported to obscenitycrimes.org or to your local FBI Field Office.

INFO FROM FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION (FBI):

To report child pornography and/or sexual exploitation of children, please contact your Crimes Against Children Coordinator at your local FBI Field Office or link to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children's CyberTipline at www.cybertipline.com. The CyberTipline allows parents and children to file a report by submitting an online form. This form is then reviewed by analysts and forwarded to law enforcement including the FBI, the U.S. Customs Service, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, and state and local police agencies.

Unsolicited Obscene Material Sent To A Child:

It is an unfortunate reality of the Internet that children will encounter obscene material online. Many times, this material is attached as an image(s) or hyperlink(s) sent to a child in an unsolicited email or "spam".

It is a violation of criminal law for any person to knowingly or attempt to send or transfer obscene material to another individual who has not attained the age of 16 years (18 USCA 1470).

Please report any incidents where a child may have received visual depictions of persons engaging in sexually explicit conduct that is obscene. (report to www.FBI.gov)

Pornography That Does Not Involve Children:

If you are an adult who is concerned about adult obscenity not involving children on the Internet, please make a report to www.obscenitycrimes.org.  They will forward your report to the U.S. Attorney General's office. 

Posession, Manufacture, and Distribution of Child Pornography:

Child pornography is a violation of federal law.  It has been defined under federal statute as a visual depiction of a minor (child younger than 18) engaged in sexually explicit conduct ( 18 U.S.C. 2256). To report a child porn email invitation: 1) copy the email to a word document. 2) send it as an attachment to tampa@fbi.gov.  To report a child porn website simply email the URL (web-site address) to the same address.

Child-Sex Tourism:

It is against the law for any United States citizen to travel abroad to engage in sexual activity with any child under the age of eighteen (18 U.S.C. 2423b). Individuals who partake in this illegal activity are subject to prosecution in the United States even if they committed the crime on foreign soil.

Online Enticement of Children For Sexual Acts:

Use of the Internet to entice, invite, or persuade a child to meet for sexual acts, or to help arrange such a meeting, is a serious offense (18 U.S.C. 2425).

Child Prostitution:

Prostitution is generally defined as performing, offering, or agreeing to perform a sexual act for any money, property, token, object, article or anything of value (18 U.S.C. 2431, 2423(a). It is illegal.

Child  Sexual Molestation:

Child sexual exploitation (not in the family), also known as extra-familial child sexual abuse, includes all sexual exploitation of a child by someone other than a family member.  Child molestation by a family member (Incest) is also against the law.

Tips From The FBI Manual on Preventing Child Abuse:

There are individuals who attempt to sexually exploit children through the use of on-line services and the Internet. Some of these individuals gradually seduce their targets through the use of attention, affection, kindness, and even gifts. These individuals are often willing to devote considerable amounts of time, money, and energy in this process. They listen to and empathize with the problems of children. They will be aware of the latest music, hobbies, and interests of children. These individuals attempt to gradually lower children's inhibitions by slowly introducing sexual context and content into their conversations.

There are other individuals, however, who immediately engage in sexually explicit conversation with children. Some offenders primarily collect and trade child-pornographic images, while others seek face-to-face meetings with children via on-line contacts.It is important for parents to understand that children can be indirectly victimized through conversation, i.e. "chat," as well as the transfer of sexually explicit information and material.

Parents and children should remember that a computer-sex offender can be any age or sex the person does not have to fit the caricature of a dirty, unkempt, older man wearing a raincoat to be someone who could harm a child.

Because they may be curious, children/adolescents sometimes use their on-line access to actively seek out such materials and individuals. Sex offenders targeting children will use and exploit these characteristics and needs. Some adolescent children may also be attracted to and lured by on-line offenders closer to their age who, although not technically child molesters, may be dangerous.

What Are Signs That Your Child Might Be At Risk On-line?

Your child spends large amounts of time on-line, especially at night.

Most children that fall victim to computer-sex offenders spend large amounts of time on-line, particularly in chat rooms. They may go on-line after dinner and on the weekends. They may be latchkey kids whose parents have told them to stay at home after school. They go on-line to chat with friends, make new friends, pass time, and sometimes look for sexually explicit information. While much of the knowledge and experience gained may be valuable, parents should consider monitoring the amount of time spent on-line.

Children on-line are at the greatest risk during the evening hours. While offenders are on-line around the clock, most work during the day and spend their evenings on-line trying to locate and lure children or seeking pornography.

You find pornography on your child's computer.

Pornography is often used in the sexual victimization of children. Sex offenders often supply their potential victims with pornography as a means of opening sexual discussions and for seduction. Child pornography may be used to show the child victim that sex between children and adults is "normal." Parents should be conscious of the fact that a child may hide the pornographic files on diskettes from them. This may be especially true if the computer is used by other family members.

Your child receives phone calls from men you don't know or is making calls, sometimes long distance, to numbers you don't recognize.

While talking to a child victim on-line is a thrill for a computer-sex offender, it can be very cumbersome. Most want to talk to the children on the telephone. They often engage in "phone sex" with the children and often seek to set up an actual meeting for real sex.

While a child may be hesitant to give out his/her home phone number, the computer-sex offenders will give out theirs. With Caller ID, they can readily find out the child's phone number. Some computer-sex offenders have even obtained toll-free 800 numbers, so that their potential victims can call them without their parents finding out. Others will tell the child to call collect. Both of these methods result in the computer-sex offender being able to find out the child's phone number.

Your child receives mail, gifts, or packages from someone you don't know.

As part of the seduction process, it is common for offenders to send letters, photographs, and all manner of gifts to their potential victims. Computer-sex offenders have even sent plane tickets in order for the child to travel across the country to meet them.

Your child turns the computer monitor off or quickly changes the screen on the monitor when you come into the room.

A child looking at pornographic images or having sexually explicit conversations does not want you to see it on the screen.

Your child becomes withdrawn from the family.

Computer-sex offenders will work very hard at driving a wedge between a child and their family or at exploiting their relationship. They will accentuate any minor problems at home that the child might have. Children may also become withdrawn after sexual victimization.

Your child is using an on-line account belonging to someone else.

Even if you don't subscribe to an on-line service or Internet service, your child may meet an offender while on-line at a friend's house or the library. Most computers come preloaded with on-line and/or Internet software. Computer-sex offenders will sometimes provide potential victims with a computer account for communications with them.

What Should You Do If You Suspect Your Child Is Communicating With A Sexual Predator On-line?

Should any of the following situations arise in your household, via the Internet or on-line service, you should immediately contact your local or state law enforcement agency, the FBI, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children:

  1. Your child or anyone in the household has received child pornography;
  2. Your child has been sexually solicited by someone who knows that your child is under 18 years of age;
  3. Your child has received sexually explicit images from someone that knows your child is under the age of 18.

If one of these scenarios occurs, keep the computer turned off in order to preserve any evidence for future law enforcement use. Unless directed to do so by the law enforcement agency, you should not attempt to copy any of the images and/or text found on the computer.

What Can You Do To Minimize The Chances Of An On-line Exploiter Victimizing Your Child?

For more information visit: http://www.fbi.gov/publications/pguide/pguidee.htm

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